REPUBLIC OF COSTA RICA


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GUEST BOOK


General info
Bolanos Island Wildlife Refuge
Santa Rosa National Park
Lomas de Barbudal Biological Reserve
Palo Verde National Park
Barra Honda National Park
Penas Blancas National Wildlife Refuge
Guayabo, Negritos and Los Pajaros Biological Reserve
Ostional National Wildlife Refuge
Carara Biological Reserve
Curu National Wildlife Refuge
Cabo Blanco Natural Reserve
Manuel Antonio National Park
Cano Island Biological Reserve
Golfito National Wildlife Refuge
Corcovado National Park
Coco Island National Park
Rincon de la Vieja National Park
Poas Volcano National Park
Braulio Carillo National Park
Irazu Volcano National Park
Guayabo National Monument
Tapanti National Park
Chirripo National Park
Hitoy-Cerere Biological Reserve
Cano Negro National Reserve
Barra del Colorado National Wildlife Refuge
Tortuguero National Park
Cahuita National Park
Gandoca-Manzanillo National Wildlife Refuge
Guanacaste National Park
Arenal Volcano National Park
Ballena National Sea Park
Juan Castro Blanco National Park
Las Baulas National Park
Esquinas National Park
Cipanci National Wildlife Refuge
Santa Elena Cloud Forest Reserve
La Cangreja National Park
Diria National Park
Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve



 
NATIONAL PARKS:
Hitoy-Cerere Biological Reserve

Hitoy-Cerere Biological Reserve

(9.154 ha). Situated in the foothills of the Cordillera de Talamanca, southwest of la Estrella Valley. It`s one of the least known reserve in the country. It was established in 1978.

Most of the trees in upper eklevation are more than 30 metres tall and the emergent trees top 50 metres. Commonly found species include the crabwood, wild tamarind, silk cotton, possum-wood and nargusta. Freguently seen animals are are the tayra, tigers, howler and white-faced monkeys and over 115 species of birds (Montezuma oropendola, vulture, chizo parrot, slatey-tailed trogon, hummingbirds).

The zone is criss-crossed by countless rocky rivers with rapids and waterfalls. In Bri-Bri Indian language, Hitoy means "shaggy", and it can have something to do with stones covered by mosses. The second word of its name Cerere stands for "clear water".


 
2004; SLUPSK; Rafal Cezary Piechocinski